EcoNurse

Dedicated to Catalyzing Ecological Awareness

The Canadian Nurses for Health and the Environment - Infirmieres et Infirmiers pour la Sante et l'Environnement (CNHE/IISE) represents Registered Nurses dedicated to the improvement of environmental health across all domains of nursing practice, policy, research and education.

CNHE logo

An Associate group of the Canadian Nurses Association, CNHE works to achieve the following objectives:

Facilitate knowledge sharing and transfer based on environmental health principles and nursing best practices;

Support evidence-based environmental health practice;

Influence policy development and legislation to support environmental nursing practice;

Promote educational and research opportunities for nurses.

CNHE/IISE members are part of a committed group, dedicated to taking a stand on environmental health issues that threaten the health and well-being of Canadians and the planet as a whole. student nurses can join for free!

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Just let leaves stay where they fall. A leaf layer several inches deep is a natural thing in any area where trees naturally grow. The leaf layer is its own mini ecosystem! Many wildlife species live in or rely on the leaf layer to find food and other habitat, including salamanders, chipmunks, box turtles, toads, shrews, earthworms, many insects species.

Autumn leaves

READ MORE AT NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION

ESLUMS

Our electronics don’t have to land in an African slum.

The world is awash in electronic waste. With an ever-expanding market for electronic goods and continually shrinking product lifecycles, managing e-waste has become a global problem. In addition to the growing volumes of discarded computers, monitors, laptops, cellphones and other electronics in our landfills, e-waste often finds its way (by container ships) from places like Canada to places like Agbogbloshie, Ghana.

In Agbogbloshie, e-waste is gold. Literally. Precious metals removed from circuit boards become a source of income for many in the informal recycling trade. But the methods used to extract these valuable materials – including open-pit burning and acid baths – are crude. Workers are exposed to a toxic mix of heavy metals, brominated flameretardants and a particularly carcinogenic class of chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Many e-waste collectors suffer a range of health effects from injuries to premature death, while nearby communities face serious chronic disease and longterm environmental degradation.

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BC Coast

BC-based filmmaker Richard Boyce’s Coastal Tar Sands explores the areas Enbridge's supertankers will navigate, loaded with oil from the Northern Gateway pipeline.

Filmmaker, activist and coastal BC native Richard Boyce has spent the past year looking at Canada’s West Coast through the lens of Enbridge’s highly controversial Northern Gateway pipeline proposal. He takes viewers on a journey along the Inner Passage, a shipping route for oceangoing vessels where a landmark proposal could see oil tankers move highly toxic diluted bitumen from Kitimat, BC – the pipeline’s terminus – to foreign markets overseas.

Boyce’s six-part video series, Coastal Tar Sands, is as scenic as it is informative. His plan is to release a feature-length documentary that will act as a retort to the proposal’s approval earlier this week.

Boyce’s knowledge of and passion for the wellbeing of BC’s environmentally sensitive central coast is obvious, and Coastal Tar Sands offers some of the most comprehensive first-hand reporting available on the subject of Northern Gateway.


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COASTAL TAR SANDS VIDEO PART 1



COASTAL TAR SANDS VIDEO PART 2



COASTAL TAR SANDS VIDEO PART 3



COASTAL TAR SANDS VIDEO PART 4



COASTAL TAR SANDS VIDEO PART 5



COASTAL TAR SANDS VIDEO PART 6



David Suzuki: What Earth Day and Earth Month really mean

by David Suzuki on Apr 8, 2014 at 4:28 pm For the Georgia Strait publication

EARTH MONTH

"April is Earth Month, and April 22 is Earth Day. We should really celebrate our small blue planet and all it provides every day, but recent events give us particular cause to reflect on our home and how we’re treating it."


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Earth Hour 2014

Earth Hour is a global movement that envisions a greener, cleaner planet. Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions, the leading driver of climate change, have increased by 32% in the past 15 years. Canada is way off-track on meeting our 2020 targets.

In 2007, 2.2 million people in Sydney, Australia did 1 small thing to show they cared about fighting climate change. They turned off the lights for Earth Hour. Turning off the lights for 1 hour won’t solve climate change. But the strong message generated by people around the
world turning off their lights together helps WWF demand the large-scale change that will.

In 2013, Earth Hour reached over 1 billion people in over 4,000 cities in over 130 countries around the world. More than 10 million of those people were Canadians, taking part in over 300 cities. Together, we sent 1 powerful message to governments and world leaders about the need for action on climate change.

Earth Hour 2014 takes place from 8:30 – 9:30 pm on March 29. Turn off your lights and show the rest of the world how much you care!

Download Tool kits for your Home, School, University or Business at:
http://momentofdarkness.ca/en/involve/tools

Test Your Knowledge about GMOs with this 15 item online quiz by Wise Mind, Healthy Body